Category: book

  • Nothing new under the sun

    “Now, nearly two and a half centuries after the Founding, the religious and political climate in America would seem a prime exhibit to support the Old Testament’s lesson that there is no thing new under the sun,” writes Jon Meacham. In 1822, Meacham explains, Jefferson worried aloud: “The atmosphere of our country is unquestionably charged…

  • Chance

    “It seemed both proper and at the same time deeply unfair that so much of life was left to chance,” says Claire Keegan, author of Small Things Like These.

  • The truth

    As Cervantes writes in Don Quixote, “The truth may be stretched thin, but it never breaks. It always surfaces above lies, as oil floats on water.” We hope what Cervantes says is true today in the age of splintered media. I visited the Cervantes Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico, recently and was inspired to read Don…

  • A mystery

    “Look at someone not as a problem to be solved, but as a mystery to be solved,” says David Brooks, The New York Times columnist. I heard Brooks speak recently at Arts & Letters Live in Dallas. His new book is How to Know a Person—The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Seen Deeply.

  • To be seen

    The thing we want most is to be seen in our fullest,” says David Brooks, The New York Times columnist. “The thing we fear most is to be seen at our fullest.” I heard Brooks speak recently at Arts & Letters Live in Dallas. His new book is How to Know a Person—The Art of…

  • Happy October!

    Happy Autumn! Happy October! Happy Almost Halloween! I just read a book that seems appropriate for the season. It’s What an Owl Know—The New Science of the World’s Most Enigmatic Birds by Jennifer Ackerman. Did you know that 260 species of owls exist today? They range, Ackerman writes, from the Elf Owl, a little nugget…

  • A blue sky

    Last month, we traveled to New Mexico—home of the big, blue sky. There, in a great bookstore, I found an interesting children’s book Big Words for Little Geniuses by Susan and James Patterson, and, in the book, I found a lovely quote. “Empyreal means heavenly, like the enchanting blue color of the sky on a…

  • A woman without a man

    “A woman without a husband is not a problem to be solved,” writes Jane Austen in her book Persuasion. Jane Austen is a wise woman. I am reading Persuasion again. –Joy

  • Reasonable?

    Jane Austen writes: “How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!” Jane Austen is a wise woman.  I am going to read Persuasion again. –Joy

  • Wise and reasonable

    Jane Austin writes: “She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.” I am going to be wise and reasonable—and read Persuasion again! –Joy