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Was the battle over on August 26, 1920?

In 1921, Alice Paul answered: “It is incredible to me that anyone should think that the fight for women’s equality has been won.” And, as we all know, the larger battle for diversity and equality in this country is still ongoing.

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Susan B. Anthony votes

Susan B. Anthony and more than 150 other women around the country voted—illegally—in 1872. The judge at Susan B. Anthony’s trial was federal Judge Ward Hunt. Anthony described him as “a small-brained, pale-faced, prim-looking man.” Judge Hunt made one BIG mistake when he asked: “Has the prisoner anything to say why sentence shall not be […]

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Who couldn’t vote in 1891?

The Illinois state constitution stated: “Idiots, lunatics, paupers, felons and women shall not be entitled to vote.” That law, we think, provides an indication of the status of women in the United States—and of the need for women’s suffrage.

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Suffragette or suffragist?

The term suffragette was most often used to refer to British women. American women generally preferred to be called suffragists—because they wanted to distance themselves from the more militant suffragettes in Great Britain. When the term suffragette was used in the United States, it was usually a term of derision or disrespect. The distinction between […]

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Who can vote?

In 1891, the Illinois constitution declared: “Idiots, lunatics, paupers, felons and women shall not be entitled to vote.”

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Trust in God

During the struggle for women’s suffrage, some men—and even some women—seemed to think that the Bible says that women shouldn’t vote. “Trust in God,” Emmeline Pankhurst said. “She will provide.”

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We, the people

“It was we, the people,” declared Susan B. Anthony. “Not we, the white male citizens. Nor yet, we, the male citizens, but we, the whole people, who formed the Union….Men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less.”

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Want equality?

“If women want any rights more than they’s got, why don’t they just take them, and not be talking about it,” said Sojourner Truth.

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The vote is power

The suffragettes battled more than seven decades to win the right to vote, writes Elaine Weiss in her book The Woman’s Hour. Finally, in 1920, after the Nineteenth Amendment had passed, Carrie Catt, one of the leading suffragettes, wrote to the women voters of the nation: “Women have suffered agony of soul which you never […]

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Why shouldn’t women vote?

During the summer of 1920, the anti-suffragettes offered plenty of reasons. “I would rather see my daughter in a coffin than at the polls,” one father exclaimed during floor debate in Little Rock. And, the liquor industry feared the “dry” ladies who want to enforce Prohibition, Elaine Weiss reports in her book The Woman’s Hour. […]

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