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Celebrating 100 years of voting

British women won the right to vote on February, 6, 1918—100 years ago. At least some British women won the right to vote. Only female property owners who were 30 or older were eligible to vote, explains The New York Times. It took another decade before Britain extended the right to vote to all women […]

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Protesting in Iran

In one of Tehran’s busiest squares, an Iranian woman removed her headscarf, tied it to a stick and waved it for all to see. Half a dozen other women have protested Islamic law by removing their headscarf, reports The New York Times. Their protest is significant in Iran, even though the women are “still small […]

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Equal pay? Prove it!

Iceland has a new law that requires companies and government agencies to prove they are paying men and women equally. “Of course, it has always been illegal to unequally pay men and women,” Frida Ros Valdimarsdottir, the chairwoman of the Icelandic Women’s Right Association, told The New York Times. “But this is a legally binding […]

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“We’re done, no more”

Time magazine has named “the silence breakers” its person of the year for 2017. The magazine is referring, of course, to the women who have come forward in droves to accuse powerful men and women of sexual harassment and assault. As actress Alyssa Milano, who has helped promote the #MeToo movement, emphasizes, “As women we […]

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The unsexing of women

Texas Congressman Rufus Handy said that he didn’t “seriously object to women’s suffrage.” Before Texas became the first state in the South to ratify the 19th Amendment in 1919, Handy explained that he feared “the result of unsexing our women….By unsexing, I mean taking away the romance and tenderness—the delicacy and gentleness that makes woman […]

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Suffragettes–childless communists?

Texas became the first state in the South to ratify the 19th Amendment in 1919. “With high hopes and enthusiasm, women stepped forth into a world in which they were citizens at last,” concluded Jane Y. McCallum. McCallum had been particularly effective convincing Texas legislators that women deserved the right to vote. The fact that […]

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Trying to be liked

“Hillary Clinton has spent 40 years trying to be liked,” writes Susanna Schrobsdorff in the September 25, 2017, issue of Time magazine. “Unfortunately, likability is too often a woman’s most valuable currency, trumping competence and worthiness. A hint of unlikability can undermine a woman’s success like nothing else. Studies show that the higher you aim, […]

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“Childless, short-haired communists”

Jane McCallum was featured in an exhibit about women’s suffrage at this year’s State Fair of Texas. Texas, I was pleased to discover, was the first state in the South to ratify the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. McCallum, a suffragette, lobbied the men in the Texas legislature, the […]

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100 years of women voting

Get ready to celebrate! Nationwide, 65 organizations already are planning to commemorate 100 years of women’s suffrage in 2020. That’s the year the 19th Amendment was passed. It’s also the year that the National American Suffrage Association, the first organization to picket at the White House, became the League of Women Voters. “Today we are […]

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Talent that wears skirts

“Tremendous amounts of talent are lost to our society just because that talent wears skirts,” Shirley Chisholm once said.

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