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Women belong

“Women belong in all the places where decisions are being made,” Ruth Bader Ginsberg once said.

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Keep working

“When you put your hand to the plow, you can’t put it down until you get to the end of the row,” Alice Paul, the suffragist, once said.

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Ordinary equality

“I never doubted that equal rights was the right direction,” Alice Paul, the suffragist, once said. “Most reforms, most problems are complicated. But to me there is nothing complicated about ordinary equality.”

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Use your anger

 “If you’re not angry, you’re either a stone, or you’re too sick to be angry,” Maya Angelou once said. “You should be angry. “You must not be bitter. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. It doesn’t do anything to the object of its displeasure. So, use that anger. “Yes. You write it. […]

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Was the battle over on August 26, 1920?

In 1921, Alice Paul answered: “It is incredible to me that anyone should think that the fight for women’s equality has been won.” And, as we all know, the larger battle for diversity and equality in this country is still ongoing.

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Celebrate on August 26!

The Tennessee Senate passed the 19th Amendment, and then the Tennessee House of Representatives passed it on August 18. However, Tennessee Governor Roberts didn’t sign the Certification of Ratification until August 24. After that, the Certification of Ratification traveled by train to Washington, and Secretary of State Colby signed it on August 26. The 19th […]

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A long social reform movement

“Women staged one of the longest social reform movements in the history of the United States,” says historian Kate Clarke Lemay in the July 10, 2020, issue of The New York Times. “This is not a boring history of nagging spinsters; it is a badass history of revolution staged by political geniuses.” Kate Clarke Lemay […]

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Susan B. Anthony votes

Susan B. Anthony and more than 150 other women around the country voted—illegally—in 1872. The judge at Susan B. Anthony’s trial was federal Judge Ward Hunt. Anthony described him as “a small-brained, pale-faced, prim-looking man.” Judge Hunt made one BIG mistake when he asked: “Has the prisoner anything to say why sentence shall not be […]

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Who couldn’t vote in 1891?

The Illinois state constitution stated: “Idiots, lunatics, paupers, felons and women shall not be entitled to vote.” That law, we think, provides an indication of the status of women in the United States—and of the need for women’s suffrage.

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Suffragette or suffragist?

The term suffragette was most often used to refer to British women. American women generally preferred to be called suffragists—because they wanted to distance themselves from the more militant suffragettes in Great Britain. When the term suffragette was used in the United States, it was usually a term of derision or disrespect. The distinction between […]

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