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Getting ready to be thankful

We have been working extra hard to get ready for Thanksgiving this year. We have been doing our best to make our house look presentable because our son Jay is bringing home his good friend Rachel for the holiday. We even bought a new garbage can because our old garbage no longer opened automatically when […]

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Where are you from?

I heard part of George Ella Lyon’s poem “Where I’m From” on NPR on August 19: I am from clothespins, from Clorox and carbon-tetrachloride. I am from the dirt under the back porch. (Black, glistening it tasted like beets.) I am from the forsythia bush, the Dutch elm whose long gone limbs I remember as […]

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Friends and sisters

“A sister can be seen as someone who is both ourselves and very much not ourselves–a special kind of double,” Toni Morrison once said. Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, “a giant of modern literature,” died August 5, 2019.

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Ubuntu

The word ubuntu is an African word that means: “I am because of who we are together.” I discovered the word in a University of New Mexico publication about family development. –Joy

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We are loving creatures

“The heart is that piece of us that longs for fusion with others,” writes David Brooks in his new book. “We are not primarily thinking creatures; we are primarily loving and desiring creatures. We are defined by what we desire. We become what we love.” Brooks’ new book is The Second Mountain—The Quest for a […]

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How thick and how deep

“As adults,” says David Brooks in his new book The Second Mountain—The Quest for a Moral Life, “we measure our lives by the quality of our relationships and the quality of our service to those relationships. Life is a qualitative endeavor, not a quantitative one. It’s not how many, but how thick and how deep.”

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Where is the madness?

Tara Westover wrote the words “everywhere—consciously, compulsively” as she tried to come to terms with her family. “When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies?” she wrote. Westover talks about her family in her amazing book Educated. She grew up in a survivalist family in Idaho.  Even though she had never seen a […]

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An inescapable network of mutuality

“In a real sense, all life is interrelated. All men (and women) are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly,” Martin Luther King once said. We found this quote in Martin Luther King’s book A Gift of Love.

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Sense of interconnection

Elaine Pagels, a professor at Princeton, writes about the death of her 6-1/2-year-old son and her husband in her new book Why Religion? The two deaths happened about 30 years ago, but, only now, she says, is she able to write about them. “You don’t get over tragedies,” she told an audience at Arts & […]

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Becoming

“There is a lot I still don’t know about America, about life, about what the future might bring,” Michelle Obama says in her book Becoming. “But I do know myself. My father, Fraser, taught me to work hard, laugh often and keep my word. “My mother, Marian, showed me how to think for myself and […]

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