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Fight like RBG

“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you,” Ruth Bader Ginsberg once said.

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Women belong

“Women belong in all the places where decisions are being made,” Ruth Bader Ginsberg once said.

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A disease of the white people

In her book Caste, Isabel Wilkerson tells how Albert Einstein was dismayed at the treatment of black people when he arrived in the United States from Germany in 1932. After he settled in Princeton, he found that Black residents were consigned to the worst parts of town, to segregated movie houses and to servant positions. […]

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Ordinary equality

“I never doubted that equal rights was the right direction,” Alice Paul, the suffragist, once said. “Most reforms, most problems are complicated. But to me there is nothing complicated about ordinary equality.”

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No spectator sport

“Life is not a spectator sport,” Jackie Robinson once said. “If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

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Use your anger

 “If you’re not angry, you’re either a stone, or you’re too sick to be angry,” Maya Angelou once said. “You should be angry. “You must not be bitter. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. It doesn’t do anything to the object of its displeasure. So, use that anger. “Yes. You write it. […]

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A long social reform movement

“Women staged one of the longest social reform movements in the history of the United States,” says historian Kate Clarke Lemay in the July 10, 2020, issue of The New York Times. “This is not a boring history of nagging spinsters; it is a badass history of revolution staged by political geniuses.” Kate Clarke Lemay […]

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Suffragette or suffragist?

The term suffragette was most often used to refer to British women. American women generally preferred to be called suffragists—because they wanted to distance themselves from the more militant suffragettes in Great Britain. When the term suffragette was used in the United States, it was usually a term of derision or disrespect. The distinction between […]

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The battle to win the vote

What event marked the beginning of women’s battle to win the vote in the United States? The Seneca Falls Convention on July 19 and 20, 1848—which was held in the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Seneca Falls, New York. More than 300 women and 40 men attended the convention to discuss “the social, civil and religious […]

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Joy, like a pearl

James Lawson, the Civil Rights leader, read this Langston Hughes poem at John Lewis’ funeral services. I dream a world where man No other man will scorn, Where love will bless the earth And peace its paths adorn I dream a world where all Will know sweet freedom’s way, Where greed no longer saps the […]

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