The marriage that made a president

Betty Boyd Carroli, in her book Lady Bird and Lyndon—The Hidden Story of a Marriage that Made a President, concludes that Lyndon never would have succeeded as a senator or made it to the White House without the help of Lady Bird. Lady Bird Johnson was “an invaluable asset who served as sounding board, financial […]

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The double bind

A double bind requires you to obey two mutually exclusive commands, explained Deborah Tannen, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University, in a recent article in The Washington Post. “Anything you do to fulfill one violates the other. Women running for office, as with all women in authority, are subject to these two demands: Be a […]

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A garden without flowers

Our friends Mark and Eva, who now live in Washington state, came to visit, and we ate hamburgers cooked outside on the grill and Greek potato salad that I made with a new recipe. Then, our friends Ken and Gail came over, and the six of us shared conversation and chocolate cake. The next day, […]

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Remember the promise

Michael Ryan writes a reminder of the promise of spring in his poem “Spring(Again)”. The birds were louder this morning, Raucous, oblivious, tweeting their teensy bird-brains out. It scared me, until I remembered it’s spring. How do they know it? A stupid question. Thank you, birdies. I had forgotten how promise feels. Ryan’s poem was […]

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Some exciting news

Lily’s eyes were bright when she announced that she had some exciting news. With a round, angelic face and two pony tails on the top of her head, Lily is one of the children in the four-year-old Sunday School class I teach. “What is your exciting news?” I asked. “I went to the opera with […]

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A woman’s clothes

El habito no hace la monja. Or, in English, the habit does not make the nun. We like the Spanish version much better than the English version: Clothes do not make the man. We found this bit of wisdom in a delightful book by Charles Aranda called Dichos—Proverbs and Sayings from the Spanish.

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Wasting time?

Andar por last ramas. Or, in English, walking through shrubbery. If you are walking through shrubbery, you are wasting your time, says Charles Aranda in his delightful book Dichos—Proverbs and Sayings from the Spanish.

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A little poison

Un poquito de veneno no mata. Or, in English, a little poison will not kill. We found this reminder about the importance of moderation in a delightful book by Charles Aranda called Dichos—Proverbs and Sayings from the Spanish.

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Praise for the morning!

I have always loved the words to this song since I first heard Cat Stevens sing them decades ago, and I was delighted to find the poem “Morning Has Broken” by Eleanor Farjean. Morning has broken like the first morning, Blackbird has spoken like the first bird. Praise for the singing! Praise for the morning!…. […]

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Thank you for green trees

Now when I take my morning walk, I see green buds on the trees and bright flowers in the lawns. In his poem “This Amazing Day,” e.e. cummings says thank you for this beauty. i thank You God for most this amazing day: for the leaping greenly spirits of trees and a blue true dream […]

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